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Emerging electrochemical and membrane-based systems to convert low-grade heat to electricity

Journal Paper
M. Rahimi, A. P. Straub, F. Zhang, X. Zhu, M. Elimelech, C. A. Gorski, B. E. Logan
Energy & Environmental Science 11, 276–285, 2018

Low-grade heat from geothermal sources and industrial plants is a significant source of sustainable power that has great potential to be converted to electricity. The two main approaches that have been extensively investigated for converting low-grade heat to electrical energy, organic Rankine cycles and solid-state thermoelectrics, have not produced high power densities or been cost-effective for such applications. Newer, alternative liquid-based technologies are being developed that can be categorized by how the heat is used. Thermoelectrochemical cells (TECs), thermo-osmotic energy conversion (TOEC) systems, and thermally regenerative electrochemical cycles (TRECs) all use low-grade heat directly in a device that generates electricity. Other systems use heat sources to prepare solutions that are used in separate devices to produce electrical power. For example, low-temperature distillation methods can be used to produce solutions with large salinity differences to generate power using membrane-based systems, such as pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) or reverse electrodialysis (RED); or highly concentrated ammonia solutions can be prepared for use in thermally regenerative batteries (TRBs). Among all these technologies, TRECs, TOEC, and TRBs show the most promise for effectively converting low-grade heat into electrical power mainly due to their high power productions and energy conversion efficiencies.

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A thermally regenerative ammonia battery with carbon-silver electrodes for converting low-grade waste heat to electricity

Journal Paper
M. Rahimi, T. Kim, C. A. Gorski, B. E. Logan
Journal of Power Sources 373, 95–102, 2018

Thermally regenerative ammonia batteries (TRABs) have shown great promise as a method to convert low-grade waste heat into electrical power, with power densities an order of magnitude higher than other approaches. However, previous TRABs based on copper electrodes suffered from unbalanced anode dissolution and cathode deposition rates during discharging cycles, limiting practical applications. To produce a TRAB with stable and reversible electrode reactions over many cycles, inert carbon electrodes were used with silver salts. In continuous flow tests, power production was stable over 100 discharging cycles, demonstrating excellent reversibility. Power densities were 23 W m−2-electrode area in batch tests, which was 64% higher than that produced in parallel tests using copper electrodes, and 30 W m−2 (net energy density of 490 Wh m−3-anolyte) in continuous flow tests. While this battery requires the use a precious metal, an initial economic analysis of the system showed that the cost of the materials relative to energy production was $220 per MWh, which is competitive with energy production from other non-fossil fuel sources. A substantial reduction in costs could be obtained by developing less expensive anion exchange membranes.

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Electrical power production from low-grade waste heat using a thermally regenerative ethylenediamine battery

Journal Paper
M. Rahimi, A. D'Angelo, C. A. Gorski, O. Scialdone, B. E. Logan
Journal of Power Sources 351, 45–50, 2017

Thermally regenerative ammonia-based batteries (TRABs) have been developed to harvest low-grade waste heat as electricity. To improve the power production and anodic coulombic efficiency, the use of ethylenediamine as an alternative ligand to ammonia was explored here. The power density of the ethylenediamine-based battery (TRENB) was 85 ± 3 W m−2-electrode area with 2 M ethylenediamine, and 119 ± 4 W m−2 with 3 M ethylenediamine. This power density was 68% higher than that of TRAB. The energy density was 478 Wh m−3-anolyte, which was ∼50% higher than that produced by TRAB. The anodic coulombic efficiency of the TRENB was 77 ± 2%, which was more than twice that obtained using ammonia in a TRAB (35%). The higher anodic efficiency reduced the difference between the anode dissolution and cathode deposition rates, resulting in a process more suitable for closed loop operation. The thermal-electric efficiency based on ethylenediamine separation using waste heat was estimated to be 0.52%, which was lower than that of TRAB (0.86%), mainly due to the more complex separation process. However, this energy recovery could likely be improved through optimization of the ethylenediamine separation process.

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Improved electrical power production of thermally regenerative batteries using a poly(phenylene oxide) based anion exchange membrane

Journal Paper
M. Rahimi, L. Zhu, K. L. Kowalski, X. Zhu, C. A. Gorski, M. A. Hickner, B. E. Logan
Journal of Power Sources 342, 956–963, 2017

Thermally regenerative ammonia-based batteries (TRABs) can be used to harvest low-grade waste heat as electrical power. To improve TRAB performance, a series of benzyltrimethyl quaternary ammonium-functionalized poly(phenylene oxide) anion exchange membranes (BTMA-AEMs) were examined for their impact on performance relative to a commercial AEM (Selemion AMV). The synthesized AEMs had different degrees of functionalization (DF; 25% and 40%), and thicknesses (50, 100 and 150 μm). Power and energy densities were shown to be a function of both DF and membrane thickness. The power density of TRAB increased by 31% using a BTMA-AEM (40% DF, 50 μm thick; 106 ± 7 W m−2) compared to the Selemion (81 ± 5 W m−2). Moreover, the energy density increased by 13% when using a BTMA-based membrane (25% DF, 150 μm thick; 350 Wh m−3) compared to the Selemion membrane (311 Wh m−3). The thermal-electric conversion efficiency improved to 0.97% with the new membrane compared to 0.86% for the Selemion. This energy recovery was 7.0% relative to the Carnot efficiency, which was 1.8 times greater than the highest previously reported value of a system used to capture low-grade waste heat as electricity.

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Removal of copper from water using a thermally regenerative electrodeposition battery

Journal Paper
M. Rahimi, Z. Schoener, X. Zhu, F. Zhang, C. A. Gorski, B. E. Logan
Journal of Hazardous Materials 322, 551–556, 2017

A thermally regenerative ammonia battery (TRAB) recently developed for electricity generation using waste heat was adapted and used here as a treatment process for solutions containing high concentrations of copper ions. Copper removal reached a maximum of 77% at an initial copper concentration (Ci) of 0.05 M, with a maximum power density (P) of 31 W m−2-electrode area. Lowering the initial copper concentration decreased the percentage of copper removal from 51% (Ci = 0.01 M, P = 13 W m−2) to 2% (Ci = 0.002 M, P = 2 W m−2). Although the final solution may require additional treatment, the adapted TRAB process removed much of the copper while producing electrical power that could be used in later treatment stages. These results show that the adapted TRAB can be a promising technology for removing copper ions and producing electricity by using waste heat as a highly available and free source of energy at many industrial sites.

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Integrating reverse-electrodialysis stacks with flow batteries to achieve improved energy recovery from salinity gradients and energy storage

Journal Paper
X. Zhu, T. Kim, M. Rahimi, C. A. Gorski, B. E. Logan
ChemSusChem 10, 797–803, 2017

Salinity gradient energy can be directly converted to electrical power using reverse electrodialysis (RED) and other technologies, but reported power densities have been too low for practical applications. Here, the RED stack performance was improved by using 2,6-dihydroxyanthraquinone and ferrocyanide as redox couples. These electrolytes were then used in a flow battery, to produce an integrated RED stack and flow battery (RED-FB) system capable of capturing, storing, and discharging salinity gradient energy. Energy captured from the RED stack was discharged in the flow battery at a maximum power density of 3.0 kW/m2-anode, which was similar to the flow batteries charged by electrical power and could be used for practical application. Salinity gradient energy captured from the RED stack was recovered from the electrolytes as electricity with a 30% efficiency, and the maximum energy density of the system was 2.4 kWh/m3-anolyte. The combined RED-FB system overcomes many limitations of previous approaches to capture, store, and use salinity gradient energy from natural or engineered sources.

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Individual and interaction effects of operating parameters on the photocatalytic degradation under visible light illumination: Response surface methodological approach

Journal Paper
M. Feilizadeh, M. Rahimi, S. M. E. Zakeri, N. Mahinpey, M. Vossoughi, M. Qanbarzadeh
The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering 95, 1228–1235, 2017

In this study, for the first time a statistical analysis based on the response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to investigate individual and interaction effects of key operating parameters of the photocatalytic degradation under visible-light irradiation using Ag-S/PEG/TiO2. Ag-S/PEG/TiO2 is a visible-light-driven photocatalyst and was synthesized (based on earlier research) by co-doping of TiO2 with silver and sulphur and addition of polyethylene glycol (as a reagent template). In addition, the model pollutant was methylene orange (MO) and the studied operating parameters included the photocatalyst loading, initial concentration of the pollutant, and pH of the solution. The statistics-based experimental design and RSM was utilized to find a quadratic model as a functional relationship between the degradation efficiency and the three operating parameters. The regression analysis with R2 value of 0.9678 showed a close fit between the model prediction and experimental data of the degradation efficiency. The analysis of variance based on the model indicated that pH of the solution was the most influential factor, while the two other operating parameters were also significant. The efficiency of MO degradation reached 94.0% under the optimum conditions (i.e. photocatalyst loading of 1.20 g/L, MO concentration of 5 mg/L, and pH of 2).

152 page minimum spine. Editor: Matt Hotze, JEM: Esther
RTP:  Diane Murphy

Harvesting Energy from Salinity Differences Using Battery Electrodes in a Concentration Flow Cell

Journal Paper
T. Kim, M. Rahimi, B. E. Logan, C. A. Gorski
Environmental Science & Technology 50, 9791–9797, 2016

Salinity-gradient energy (SGE) technologies produce carbon-neutral and renewable electricity from salinity differences between seawater and freshwater. Capacitive mixing (CapMix) is a promising class of SGE technologies that captures energy using capacitive or battery electrodes, but CapMix devices have produced relatively low power densities and often require expensive materials. Here, we combined existing CapMix approaches to develop a concentration flow cell that can overcome these limitations. In this system, two identical battery (i.e., faradaic) electrodes composed of copper hexacyanoferrate (CuHCF) were simultaneously exposed to either high (0.513 M) or low (0.017 M) concentration NaCl solutions in channels separated by a filtration membrane. The average power density produced was 411 ± 14 mW m–2 (normalized to membrane area), which was twice as high as previously reported values for CapMix devices. Power production was continuous (i.e., it did not require a charging period and did not vary during each step of a cycle) and was stable for 20 cycles of switching the solutions in each channel. The concentration flow cell only used inexpensive materials and did not require ion-selective membranes or precious metals. The results demonstrate that the concentration flow cell is a promising approach for efficiently harvesting energy from salinity differences.

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Evaluating battery-like reactions to harvest energy from salinity differences using ammonium bicarbonate salt solutions

Journal Paper
T. Kim, M. Rahimi, B. E. Logan, C. A. Gorski
ChemSusChem 9, 981-988, 2016

Mixing entropy batteries (MEBs) are a new approach to generate electricity from salinity differences between two aqueous solutions. To date, MEBs have only been prepared from solutions containing chloride salts, owing to their relevance in natural salinity gradients created from seawater and freshwater. We hypothesized that MEBs could capture energy using ammonium bicarbonate (AmB), a thermolytic salt that can be used to convert waste heat into salinity gradients. We examined six battery electrode materials. Several of the electrodes were unstable in AmB solutions or failed to produce expected voltages. Of the electrode materials tested, a cell containing a manganese oxide electrode and a metallic lead electrode produced the highest power density (6.3 mW m−2). However, this power density is still low relative to previously reported NaCl-based MEBs and heat recovery systems. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that MEBs could indeed be used to generate electricity from AmB salinity gradients.

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A thermally-regenerative ammonia-based flow battery for electrical energy recovery from waste heat

Journal Paper
X. Zhu, M. Rahimi, C. A. Gorski, B. E. Logan
ChemSusChem 9, 873–879, 2016

Large amounts of low-grade waste heat (temperatures <130 °C) are released during many industrial, geothermal, and solar-based processes. Using thermally-regenerative ammonia solutions, low-grade thermal energy can be converted to electricity in battery systems. To improve reactor efficiency, a compact, ammonia-based flow battery (AFB) was developed and tested at different solution concentrations, flow rates, cell pairs, and circuit connections. The AFB achieved a maximum power density of 45 W m−2 (15 kW m−3) and an energy density of 1260 Wh manolyte−3, with a thermal energy efficiency of 0.7 % (5 % relative to the Carnot efficiency). The power and energy densities of the AFB were greater than those previously reported for thermoelectrochemical and salinity-gradient technologies, and the voltage or current could be increased using stacked cells. These results demonstrated that an ammonia-based flow battery is a promising technology to convert low-grade thermal energy to electricity.

116 spine minimum. half size. Editor: J'Na  JEM: Esther
RTP: Erin Dalton

Enhancement of Efficient Ag−S/TiO2 Nanophotocatalyst for Photocatalytic Degradation under Visible Light

Journal Paper
M. Feilizadeh, M. Vossoughi, S.M.E. Zakeri, M. Rahimi
Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research 53, 9578-9586, 2014

Abstract

A new photocatalyst (Ag−S/PEG/TiO2) was synthesized by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) to an efficient Ag−S/TiO2 photocatalyst, to obtain a photocatalyst that is highly active under visible light. In addition to Ag−S/PEG/TiO2, Ag−S/TiO2 and pure TiO2 were prepared to compare their properties and activities. Specifically, the morphologies and microstructures of the nanophotocatalysts were characterized by means of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption−desorption measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV−visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Moreover, to evaluate their activities, the synthesized powders were used for the degradation of acid orange 7 (AO7) and methylene blue (MB) azo dyes in aqueous solution under low-voltage lightemitting diodes (LEDs) as the visible-light source. It was found that addition of PEG to Ag−S/TiO2 increases the photodegradation of AO7 and MB by about 28.82% and 24.24%, respectively, in comparison with Ag−S/TiO2 without PEG addition.

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Converting low-grade waste heat into electricity using a silver ammonia battery

Conference
M. Rahimi, T. Kim, C. A. Gorski, B. E. Logan
20th Annual Environmental Chemistry and Microbiology Student Symposium (ECMSS), The Pennsylvania State University, April 21, 22, 2017. (best poster presentation)
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Application of thermally regenerative battery to remove copper from wastewater

Conference
M. Rahimi, Z. Schoener, X. Zhu, F. Zhang, C. A. Gorski, B. E. Logan
252nd American Chemical Society National Meeting & Exposition, Philadelphia, PA, August 21-25, 2016.
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Application of thermally regenerative battery for wastewater treatment containing copper ions

Conference
M. Rahimi, Z. Schoener, X. Zhu, F. Zhang, C. A. Gorski, B. E. Logan
19th Annual Environmental Chemistry and Microbiology Student Symposium (ECMSS), The Pennsylvania State University, April 8, 9, 2016.
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Effect of Transition Metals Addition on Photocatalytic Activity of co-doped TiO2 Nanoparticles under Visible Light Irradiation

Conference paper
M. Asghari, M.E. Zakeri, M. Feilizadeh, M. Rahimi, M. Vosoughi
4th International Congress on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Kashan, Iran, September 8-10, 2012
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Effect of Synthesis Parameters of Doped TiO2 on the Photocatalytic Degradation Efficiency under Visible Light

Conference paper
M.E. Zakeri, M. Rahimi, A. Delparish, M. Asghari, M. Vosoughi
14th Iranian National Conference on Chemical Engineering, Tehran, Iran, October 16-18, 2012 (Keynote lecture)
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Degradation of azo dyes using Cu, Zn, S three-doped TiO2 photocatalysis under visible light irradiation

Conference paper
M. Rahimi, A. Delparish, M.E. Zakeri, M. Feilizadeh, M. Vosoughi, M. Asghari
The 6th National Conference and Exhibition on Environmental Engineering, Tehran, Iran, November 17-21, 2012

Mathematical modeling of CO2 and H2S absorption using MEA in hollow fiber membrane contactors: Investigation on reactor properties

Conference paper
M. Rahimi, M. Salim, O. Koohshekan, M. H. Al-Marzouqi
The First Conference on Process Engineering in Oil, Gas and Energy (PROCESS01), Tehran, Iran, May 16, 2013

A new method for removal of CO2 from natural gas using hollow fiber membrane Contractor: modeling and investigate on operating parameters

Conference paper
M. Rahimi, M. Salim, O. Koohshekan, M. H. Al-Marzouqi
The First National Conference on New Technologies in Chemistry & Chemical Engineering (NCNC01), Tehran, Iran, May 16, 2013

Petroleum refinery wastes: Characteristics and treatment methods

Conference paper
A. Delashoob, M. Rahimi, M. Borghei
3rd National Conference on Health, Environment & Sustainable Development, Bandar Abbas, Iran, February 19-20, 2014